What is crochet?

    Crochet is a centuries old craft that takes its name from the French word crochet, which means hook. Crochet, is a fun and relaxing hobby and easy to learn. Using this popular needlecraft, you can create beautiful fashion and home décor projects such as tops, hats, ponchos, scarves, doilies, tablecloths and bedspreads as well as adorable items just for babies.

    Only two basic supplies are needed to crochet  - a hook and a ball of thread or yarn. All crochet stitches are a series of yarn overs or wraps of thread around the hook, but once you master the single crochet stitch the rest come easily! While most patterns start with a slip stitch and series of loops called chains, you can even learn to create foundations without a traditional chain. Crochet projects are worked in rows, in which you stitch back and forth, each row on top of the row before, or rounds, in which you work around and around a centre ring of chains, creating a geometric shape like a square, circle, or hexagon. A motif is a geometric piece that you create as many times as needed, then stitch together to form your final project.

     How to crochet with DMC click here.
                         
    • DMC Crochet Threads
    • Crochet Hook
    • DMC Embroidery Scissors


     

    ABOUT CROCHET THREADS



    Crochet thread comes in various sizes, types, colours and quantities. Threads are sized by weight with each weight identified by a number, the lower the number, the thicker the thread. For example size 3 is a much heavier thread than size 8. Thread sizes include sizes 3, 5, 8,10, 20, 30, 40 and up. Sizes 30 and 40, ideal for lacy patterns, are used less frequently. Crochet thread balls vary in meterage (yardage), which is indicated on the packaging. Project instructions usually indicate the number of balls required and the designated thread size to complete a project.

     

    DYE LOT


     
    Since the colour of crochet threads can vary slightly from dye lot to dye lot, manufacturers include a dye lot number on each label. This number guarantees that crochet thread with the same dye lot number will be the exact same colour. When purchasing crochet thread for a project, it is recommended that you buy all the thread for the project at the same time and with the same dye-lot number.


    DMC CROCHET THREADS


    All DMC Crochet Threads are made from the highest quality fibers, and 100% colourfast.
     
    DMC Petra – A 100% mercerised cotton thread made from the best quality cotton. Available in 100gm balls in sizes 3, 5 and 8.

    DMC Natura Just Cotton - A 100% cotton thread with a matt finish.  Available in 50g balls (approx. 155m)

    DMC Cebelia - A 100%, double mercerised, combed cotton for a beautiful smooth and silky appearance. Double mercerization makes it strong and particularly suitable for work that requires a resistant and stiff finish. It is perfect for decorative home ware such as tablecloths, tablemats, curtains and cushions. This premium quality thread is available in sizes 10, 20,30 and 40.

    DMC Cordonnet –  An excellent quality six cord 100% double-mercerised cotton. The threads are exceptionally strong and have a beautiful glossy finish. They are perfect for fine and intricate crochet and lace work including exquisite borders on handkerchiefs, tablemats, collars, gloves and other clothing accessories. Use the finer sized Cordonnet for Lace Making. Cordonnet thread is available in a ball put up in sizes 20, 30, 40, 50, 60, 70, 80 and 100

    DMC Pearl Cotton Balls – Non-divisible beautifully twisted lustrous mercerised 100% cotton thread in a ball put up. Available in size 5, 8 and 12.

    Crochet Cotton Size Table

    Reference the table below to see the available sizes of DMC Crochet Cottons

    Size   3   5   8  10  12  20  30  40  50  60  70  80 100
    Petra X X X                    
    Natura Just Cotton                          
    Cebelia 167       X   X X X          
    Cebelia 167A       X   X X X          
    Cordonnet           X X X X X X X X
    Babylo       X   X X X          
    Pearl Cotton   X X   X                
    Tatting Cotton                       X  


    CROCHET HOOK SIZE CHART

     
    The recommended Hook Sizes (mm) to use with DMC Crochet Thread Sizes

    DMC
    Thread
      3   5   8  10  12  20  30  40  50  60  70  80 100
    Petra 2.50 1.75
    -
    2.00

    1.25                    
    Natura Just Cotton 3.00            
    Cebelia
          1.50
    -
    1.75

      1.25
    -
    1.50

    1.00
    -
    1.25

    0.75
    -
    1.00

             
    Cordonnet       1.50 

      1.25

    1.00

    1.00

    1.00

    1.00

    0.75

    0.75

    0.60

    Babylo       1.50
    -
    1.75

      1.25
    -
    1.50

    1.00
    -
    1.25

    0.75
    -
    1.00

             
    Pearl Cotton 2.50 



    1.75
    -
    2.00

    1.25



      1.00



                   
    Tatting Cotton                       0.75


     


    CROCHET HOOKS

     
    Crochet hooks are available in steel, aluminum, plastic, and all sorts of exotic materials like rosewood or graphite. They come in various standardised sizes to accommodate different sizes of thread or yarn. The important thing to remember is that a crochet hook for thread is called a steel, thread, or lace hook, and the hook sizes get larger as the number gets higher – for example, a size 3.00mm hook is larger than a size 2.00mm hook.

    The smallest hook is a 0.60mm; the largest is a 19.00mm; with the extra large specialty hooks for crochet rugs or novelty yarns. Always make sure your hook is an appropriate size for your yarn.


    CROCHET PATTERN INSTRUCTIONS

    Crochet Pattern Instructions include everything you will need to create the crochet design, including the type and quantity of crochet thread, hook size, tension and complete row-by-row instructions. There are a large variety of Crochet Patterns available. A good place to start is the DMC Club for Free Patterns and the Inspiration section on this web site. Other places include your local Newsagents, Craft Store, book stores, and DMC Stockists who have a large selection of crochet leaflets, books, and magazines like Inside Crochet magazine.

    Getting Ready

    Find Projects by Your Skill Levels


    Beginner Level

    Projects for first-time crocheters generally use only one or two basic stitches. They use thick threads and large hooks that are easier to work with, rather than fine threads and small hooks. Garments in this category are simple shapes. A simple one-colour scarf that uses a size 3 Petra or Natura Just Cotton crochet thread would be a good beginner project.



    Easy Level

    These projects often use two or more colours and may call for a finer thread and smaller hook than beginner projects. Easy level projects can use the same thread and hook as a beginner project, but may include a series of moderately complicated stitches. They may also take more time to complete than beginner projects. A good project in this skill level would be a multi-colour striped scarf using size 5 thread such as DMC Petra.



    Intermediate Level

    These projects require more crochet experience than easy projects and use a variety of techniques and more complicated stitch patterns. Intermediate projects may have colour changes more often than easy projects, but their degree of difficulty generally depends on how difficult the stitch patterns are. Once again, the patterns may call for threads and hooks of all sizes. Garments need shaping and may call for buttonholes and other details not found in easy projects. A good project for this level would be a cardigan sweater with a V-neck that uses 3 or more stitches with bust shaping, buttonholes and a picot edging.



    Experienced Level

    These projects have intricate stitch patterns, techniques and dimension such as non-repeating patterns and multi-colour techniques. They call for fine threads and small hooks. Garments generally have more increases and decreases in stitch counts to produce detailed shaping. They generally have detailed finishing stitches. A project for this level would be a form-fitting, lacy sweater that uses a lacy stitch pattern, size 20 thread and has buttonholes and inset pockets.


    UNDERSTANDING CROCHET PATTERNS

    Abbreviations and symbols

    In the UK the instructions are written row-by row or round-by-round with the help of abbreviations, symbols and terms. Instructions written in other countries usually use charts and symbols rather than row- by-row written instructions.

    Most crochet instructions are written using a standard set of abbreviations and symbols. DMC recommends you downloading the PDF of this abbreviation list and mounting it on a card to keep handy while you work.

    Pattern instructions in the form of charts and symbols are universal and simple and easy to read. Below is a sample chart with symbols and a basic explanation on how to read it.




    Reading Written Pattern Instructions Reading written pattern instructions is relatively easy once you get used to the abbreviations, symbols and terms. Listed below are a sample instructions and their explanation given in italics.

    - Edging instructions written with abbreviations
      Ch a multiple of 6 + 2 for each inch of edging needed.
    - Row 1: dc in 2nd ch from hook and in ea ch across, ch1, turn.
    - Interpreting the Instructions


    You will be making 6 heart motifs. Make 6ch per heart motif for a total of 36ch plus 2 additional ch for a grand total of 38ch. Row 1: Insert your hook into the 2nd ch and make a dc. (Tip: Do NOT count the loop on the hook as it is a part f the 2nd ch). When the dc is complete, put your hook in the next stitch and make another dc stitch. Continue to dc in each stitch across the row. At the end the hook will be at the right end of row.

    Reading a Crochet Chart

    With a little practice, a crochet chart is easy to read and follow. Once the symbols are familiar to you, you can see the entire patterns at a glance. No more losing your place in lengthy row-by-row written instructions.



    - This chart is very clear, because it's easy to see that the pattern is a heart with a ruffled border around it.

    - For this Heart Border, read the chart from the solid black triangle at the bottom point of the heart up to the top.

    - To the right of the black triangle, which is the starting point, there are 3 blank circles. Each one represents a chain stitch. These 3 chains are the foundation row.

    - The first row includes 3 capital Ts. Each capital T represents a half treble crochet stitch that is to be made in each one of the 3 chains in the foundation row.

    - The second row shows 2 capital Ts coming out of each half treble crochet stitch (or capital T) in the first row. Therefore, make two half treble crochet stitches in each one of the half treble crochet stitches in the first row. There are now 6 half treble crochet stitches in the second row.

    - Continue to read the chart to the top of the heart. Then add the border by following the chain and double crochet symbols that surround the heart.


    WORKING GARMENTS

    If you are making a garment, you need to know some special terms.

    Right front, right sleeve, right shoulder: These all refer to the actual body part on which the piece will be worn – the right arm, etc. The same applies to left front, left sleeve, left shoulder.

    Right side, wrong side: You may be told to work with the right (or wrong) side of the piece facing you. The right side of a garment is the side that will be seen when it is worn.

    Right-hand or Left-hand Corner: You may be asked to join yarn in a specific corner. This means the corner of the piece nearest your right (or your left) hand.

    At the same time: This is used when you are asked to work two different steps (perhaps shaping at the armhole and at the neck) at the same time.


    DMC CROCHET GLOSSARY OF TERMS

    There are several terms used in crochet instructions which are listed below:

    Back loop/ Front loop: Back loop refers to the loop of the stitch you are to work in farthest away from you; front loop is the loop closest to you.

    Continue in Pattern as Established: Usually refers to a pattern stitch and means to continue working the pattern in the same way you were up to this point, and working any increases or decreases in such a manner that the stitch pattern remains the same.

    Tension/Gauge: Refers to the number of stitches and rows you need to have per inch in order for your project to turn out the same size as the pattern. It is usually given in a 10cm (4”) range, and the pattern will tell you which stitch is being counted.

    Join: Refers to the slip stitch used to join two stitches as indicated in the pattern.

    Left Front: Refers to the part of the garments that will be worn on the left side.

    Left-Hand Side: Refers to the side nearest your left hand as you are working.

    Multiple: Stitch multiple usually refers to the number of stitches required for a specific pattern repeat. For example, if you were stitching a row of pattern repeats which took six stitches each, your pattern would note you were working in a multiple of 6. When starting a project, you will often see a line like “Ch a multiple of 6 + 2”. You almost always have more chains in your foundation than stitches in the first row because of a beginning or ending stitch, or a turning chain being needed. In the example above, if I wanted ten repeats of the stitch, I would chain 62, or 10 x 6 = 60 + 2= 62.

    Post: Refers to the vertical part of a completed stitch.

    Right Front: Refers to the part of a garment that will be worn on the right side.

    Right Side: Refers to the side of the crochet piece that will be displayed.

    Right-Hand Side: Refers to the side nearest your right hand as you are working.

    Turn: Refers to turning the crochet piece over to the reverse side to begin a new row.

    Work Even: Refers to working in the same fashion without increasing or decreasing.

    Wrong Side: Refers to the side of the crochet piece which will be hidden.

    CROCHET PATTERN INSTRUCTIONS

    Crochet Pattern Instructions include everything you will need to create the crochet design, including the type and quantity of crochet thread, hook size, tension and complete row-by-row instructions. There are a large variety of Crochet Patterns available. A good place to start is the DMC Club for Free Patterns and the Inspiration section on this web site. Other places include your local Newsagents, Craft Store, book stores, and DMC Stockists who have a large selection of crochet leaflets, books, and magazines like Inside Crochet magazine.

    Getting Ready

    Find Projects by Your Skill Levels


    Beginner Level

    Projects for first-time crocheters generally use only one or two basic stitches. They use thick threads and large hooks that are easier to work with, rather than fine threads and small hooks. Garments in this category are simple shapes. A simple one-colour scarf that uses a size 3 Petra or Natura Just Cotton crochet thread would be a good beginner project.



    Easy Level

    These projects often use two or more colours and may call for a finer thread and smaller hook than beginner projects. Easy level projects can use the same thread and hook as a beginner project, but may include a series of moderately complicated stitches. They may also take more time to complete than beginner projects. A good project in this skill level would be a multi-colour striped scarf using size 5 thread such as DMC Petra.



    Intermediate Level

    These projects require more crochet experience than easy projects and use a variety of techniques and more complicated stitch patterns. Intermediate projects may have colour changes more often than easy projects, but their degree of difficulty generally depends on how difficult the stitch patterns are. Once again, the patterns may call for threads and hooks of all sizes. Garments need shaping and may call for buttonholes and other details not found in easy projects. A good project for this level would be a cardigan sweater with a V-neck that uses 3 or more stitches with bust shaping, buttonholes and a picot edging.



    Experienced Level

    These projects have intricate stitch patterns, techniques and dimension such as non-repeating patterns and multi-colour techniques. They call for fine threads and small hooks. Garments generally have more increases and decreases in stitch counts to produce detailed shaping. They generally have detailed finishing stitches. A project for this level would be a form-fitting, lacy sweater that uses a lacy stitch pattern, size 20 thread and has buttonholes and inset pockets.


    UNDERSTANDING CROCHET PATTERNS

    Abbreviations and symbols

    In the UK the instructions are written row-by row or round-by-round with the help of abbreviations, symbols and terms. Instructions written in other countries usually use charts and symbols rather than row- by-row written instructions.

    Most crochet instructions are written using a standard set of abbreviations and symbols. DMC recommends you downloading the PDF of this abbreviation list and mounting it on a card to keep handy while you work.

    Pattern instructions in the form of charts and symbols are universal and simple and easy to read. Below is a sample chart with symbols and a basic explanation on how to read it.




    Reading Written Pattern Instructions Reading written pattern instructions is relatively easy once you get used to the abbreviations, symbols and terms. Listed below are a sample instructions and their explanation given in italics.

    - Edging instructions written with abbreviations
      Ch a multiple of 6 + 2 for each inch of edging needed.
    - Row 1: dc in 2nd ch from hook and in ea ch across, ch1, turn.
    - Interpreting the Instructions


    You will be making 6 heart motifs. Make 6ch per heart motif for a total of 36ch plus 2 additional ch for a grand total of 38ch. Row 1: Insert your hook into the 2nd ch and make a dc. (Tip: Do NOT count the loop on the hook as it is a part f the 2nd ch). When the dc is complete, put your hook in the next stitch and make another dc stitch. Continue to dc in each stitch across the row. At the end the hook will be at the right end of row.

    Reading a Crochet Chart

    With a little practice, a crochet chart is easy to read and follow. Once the symbols are familiar to you, you can see the entire patterns at a glance. No more losing your place in lengthy row-by-row written instructions.



    - This chart is very clear, because it's easy to see that the pattern is a heart with a ruffled border around it.

    - For this Heart Border, read the chart from the solid black triangle at the bottom point of the heart up to the top.

    - To the right of the black triangle, which is the starting point, there are 3 blank circles. Each one represents a chain stitch. These 3 chains are the foundation row.

    - The first row includes 3 capital Ts. Each capital T represents a half treble crochet stitch that is to be made in each one of the 3 chains in the foundation row.

    - The second row shows 2 capital Ts coming out of each half treble crochet stitch (or capital T) in the first row. Therefore, make two half treble crochet stitches in each one of the half treble crochet stitches in the first row. There are now 6 half treble crochet stitches in the second row.

    - Continue to read the chart to the top of the heart. Then add the border by following the chain and double crochet symbols that surround the heart.


    WORKING GARMENTS

    If you are making a garment, you need to know some special terms.

    Right front, right sleeve, right shoulder: These all refer to the actual body part on which the piece will be worn – the right arm, etc. The same applies to left front, left sleeve, left shoulder.

    Right side, wrong side: You may be told to work with the right (or wrong) side of the piece facing you. The right side of a garment is the side that will be seen when it is worn.

    Right-hand or Left-hand Corner: You may be asked to join yarn in a specific corner. This means the corner of the piece nearest your right (or your left) hand.

    At the same time: This is used when you are asked to work two different steps (perhaps shaping at the armhole and at the neck) at the same time.


    DMC CROCHET GLOSSARY OF TERMS

    There are several terms used in crochet instructions which are listed below:

    Back loop/ Front loop: Back loop refers to the loop of the stitch you are to work in farthest away from you; front loop is the loop closest to you.

    Continue in Pattern as Established: Usually refers to a pattern stitch and means to continue working the pattern in the same way you were up to this point, and working any increases or decreases in such a manner that the stitch pattern remains the same.

    Tension/Gauge: Refers to the number of stitches and rows you need to have per inch in order for your project to turn out the same size as the pattern. It is usually given in a 10cm (4”) range, and the pattern will tell you which stitch is being counted.

    Join: Refers to the slip stitch used to join two stitches as indicated in the pattern.

    Left Front: Refers to the part of the garments that will be worn on the left side.

    Left-Hand Side: Refers to the side nearest your left hand as you are working.

    Multiple: Stitch multiple usually refers to the number of stitches required for a specific pattern repeat. For example, if you were stitching a row of pattern repeats which took six stitches each, your pattern would note you were working in a multiple of 6. When starting a project, you will often see a line like “Ch a multiple of 6 + 2”. You almost always have more chains in your foundation than stitches in the first row because of a beginning or ending stitch, or a turning chain being needed. In the example above, if I wanted ten repeats of the stitch, I would chain 62, or 10 x 6 = 60 + 2= 62.

    Post: Refers to the vertical part of a completed stitch.

    Right Front: Refers to the part of a garment that will be worn on the right side.

    Right Side: Refers to the side of the crochet piece that will be displayed.

    Right-Hand Side: Refers to the side nearest your right hand as you are working.

    Turn: Refers to turning the crochet piece over to the reverse side to begin a new row.

    Work Even: Refers to working in the same fashion without increasing or decreasing.

    Wrong Side: Refers to the side of the crochet piece which will be hidden.

    HOLDING A CROCHET HOOK


    There are two ways to hold the hook.


    A. Hold the hook between your index finger and thumb the way you hold pencil. This method, which uses your wrist, is most often used when working with thread of light-weight yarns.

    B. Hold the hook between your index finger and thumb the way you hold a knife to spread butter or cut meat. This method, which uses your shoulder muscles, is most often used when working with yarn.

    Note: Whether you are crocheting with thread or yarn, use the method which is the most comfortable for you. There are no hard and fast rules about which method is correct.






    STARTING YOUR CROCHET PROJECT




      - To begin, create a sample square/swatch to make sure your tension/gauge is correct.

      - Chain your foundation row a little looser than the gauge so the bottom of your project will not pucker or pull inward.

      Carefully follow the written instructions or chart for creating the design.

      - Sooner or later you are going to run out of yarn or thread. It's best to join the new thread at the end of a row for a neater appearance. When you're about to run out of thread, work your last stitch until there are 2 loops left on your hook. Leaving a tail, draw the end of the new yarn through the 2 loops on your hook. Then continue working with the new ball of yarn. With a large-eyed needle, weave in the ends of both balls of yarn to secure. This method is also used when joining a new colour of yarn.

      - With the abbreviations terms at hand, let’s look at a typical pattern. A pattern may be worked in rows (that is, back and forth to form a flat piece such as an afghan) or in rounds (worked around to form a tube with no seams, such as a hat).

      - Whatever way the pattern is to be worked, the very first thing you must do is make a slip knot on your hook. Usually the pattern does not tell you to do this but it is always assumed that every project is started with a slip knot. See below for how to create a slip knot in 3 easy steps.


    TIPS: 

    - Select a crochet design of your choice. Read the instructions carefully to make sure it is in your skill level and that you have the crochet thread and hook called for in the instructions. If you do not want to use the yarn or thread called for, you may substitute a yarn or thread that is the same weight and will produce the same tension/gauge.



    SLIP KNOT



    Step 1

    To begin, slide the hook into the knot, pull the two ends of thread to tighten the knot and form a loop.



    Step 2 Holding the Thread
    Hold the hook (which has been placed through the slip knot) in your right hand. Hold the bottom of the knot with your left thumb and index finger.

    Hold the thread in your left hand so that it runs over the index finger, under the middle finger, over the ring finger and under the little/pinkie finger. Use the thread between the thumb and index finger to make the crochet stitches.

    Step 3 Yarn Over

    Refers to catching the thread in the groove of the hook by bringing the thread over the top of the hook from back to front.

    Note: All the illustrations shown are for a right-handed crocheter.


    DMC CROCHET STITCH GUIDE


     
    CHAIN STITCH (CH)

    Yarn over, draw thread through loop on hook. Continue to yarn over and draw thread through loop until desired number of chains.



    SLIP STITCH (SS)

    For joining - insert hook in indicated stitch, yarn over and draw thread through stitch and loop on hook. For moving - yarn over—insert hook in indicated stitch, yarn over, draw through stitch and loop.


    DOUBLE CROCHET (DC)
     

     
    Insert hook in stitch; yarn over and draw thread through, yarn over and draw thread through both loops on hook.
    Double Crochet 2 Together (dc2tog)

    Insert hook into next stitch, yarn over hook and draw through stitch, insert hook into next stitch, yarn over hook and draw through stitch, yarn over hook and draw through remaining 3 loops.  (1dc now decreased).

    Double Crochet 3 together dc3tog

    Insert hook into next stitch, yarn over hook and draw through stitch, insert hook into next stitch, yarn over hook and draw through stitch, insert hook into next stitch, yarn over hook and draw through stitch, yarn over hook and draw through remaining 4 loops. (2dc now decreased)

     
    HALF TREBLE (HTR)
     

     
    Yarn over, insert hook in stitch, yarn over and draw thread through, yarn over and draw thread through all 3 loops on hook.

     
    TREBLE CROCHET 


    Yarn over, insert hook in stitch, yarn over and draw thread through, yarn over and draw thread through 2 loops, yarn over and draw through 2 loops on hook.


    DOUBLE TREBLE CROCHET (DTR)
     

     
    Yarn over twice, insert hook in 4th stitch from hook, yarn over, draw thread through, (yarn over and draw thread through 2 loops on hook) 3 times.

     
    TRIPLE TREBLE CROCHET (TTR)
     


    Yarn over 3 times, insert hook in 6th ch from hook, yarn over and pull through 2 loops; continue yarn over and pull through 2 loops until 2 loops left on hook, yarn over and pull through 2 loops, 1 loop left on hook.

     
    PICOT (P)
     


    3ch, insert hook in 3rd st from hook and pull loop through.

     
    POPCORN OF 5 TREBLES (PC5TR)
     

     Make five treble stitches in indicated stitch on the previous row. Leave last loop of each stitch on hook; after 5th double yarn over and pull through all loops on hook.

    Increase by One Stitch in Double Crochet
     

     
    Insert hook in indicated stitch and pull up a loop, insert hook in next and pull up a loop. Yarn over draw through both loops.

    Decrease by one stitch in Double Crochet
    Insert hook in indicated stitch, and pull up a loop, insert hook in next stitch and pull up a loop, yarn over and pull through all 3 loops on hook.


    There are several terms used in crochet instructions which are listed below:

    Back loop/ Front loop

    Back loop refers to the loop of the stitch you are to work in farthest away from you; front loop is the loop closest to you.
     

    Continue in Pattern as Established


    Usually refers to a pattern stitch and means to continue working the pattern in the same way you were up to this point, and working any increases or decreases in such a manner that the stitch pattern remains the same.

    Tension/Gauge


    Refers to the number of stitches and rows you need to have per inch in order for your project to turn out the same size as the pattern. It is usually given in a 10cm (4”) range, and the pattern will tell you which stitch is being counted.

    Join

    Refers to the slip stitch used to join two stitches as indicated in the pattern.

    Left Front

    Refers to the part of the garments that will be worn on the left side.

    Left-Hand Side

    Refers to the side nearest your left hand as you are working.

    Multiple

    Stitch multiple usually refers to the number of stitches required for a specific pattern repeat. For example, if you were stitching a row of pattern repeats which took six stitches each, your pattern would note you were working in a multiple of 6. When starting a project, you will often see a line like “Ch a multiple of 6 + 2”. You almost always have more chains in your foundation than stitches in the first row because of a beginning or ending stitch, or a turning chain being needed. In the example above, if I wanted ten repeats of the stitch, I would chain 62, or 10 x 6 = 60 + 2= 62.

    Post

    Refers to the vertical part of a completed stitch.

    Right Front

    Refers to the part of a garment that will be worn on the right side.

    Right Side

    Refers to the side of the crochet piece that will be displayed.

    Right-Hand Side

    Refers to the side nearest your right hand as you are working.

    Turn

    Refers to turning the crochet piece over to the reverse side to begin a new row.

    Work Even

    Refers to working in the same fashion without increasing or decreasing.

    Wrong Side

    Refers to the side of the crochet piece which will be hidden.

    FINISHING THE CROCHET PROJECT

    1- Using a tapestry needle weave in all ends to hide them in the body of the crochet.

    2- Block all pieces to the measurements given in the pattern.

    3- If multiple pieces need to be joined together, as for a garment, seam the pieces. You may either put the right sides together overcast stitch the seams or join them with a slip stitch or double crochet, or hold them with the wrong sides facing each other and use the ladder stitch from the right side.

    4- Attach any buttons or embellishments.
    Block your Crochet Project Blocking is a process in which your crocheted item is gently stretched or pinned into the proper shape, then allowed to dry naturally so it will stay in shape. Blocking can be as simple as using a warm iron to press a garment to the correct shape or it may be as structured as using a stiffening solution such as starch to make the item stiff.

    If you simply wish to block the item, but not stiffen or starch it, follow the recommendations below.

     
    • If necessary, wash your project by hand using a mild soap and cold water.
     
    • Rinse it well in cold water
     
    • Do not wring the item. Place it in a thick towel and roll it while applying pressure to force the water out of the item and into the towel.
                                 
    • If your piece is clean, lightly spray it with water to dampen it.
     
    • With the right side up, spread the item on a flat, padded surface.
     
    • Smooth the project to the correct size, making sure all loops, picots, etc are open.
     
    • If necessary pin the piece in place with rust-proof pins.
     
    • If desired, lightly spray with spray starch.
     
    •  Let dry completely.

     If you want to starch or stiffen your item, you will need the following supplies:

                                
    • Stiffening solution such as:
      • A commercial stiffening solution found in craft or needlecraft stores;
      • White craft glue; or
      • A thick solution of boilable starch (liquid or spray starches will not work).
     
    • Plastic bag with a zipper seal
     
    • Pinning board such as a sheet of Styrofoam, heavy cardboard, fabric cutting board, or foam floor tiles from the hardware store.
     
    • Rust-proof straight pins
     
    • Blocking form, if one is need, the pattern will call for the correct shape and size. It can be as simple as a tea cup or mixing bowl.
     
    • Spray bottle of water if necessary to dampen the item.


    Follow these guidelines to starch or stiffen your item:

                                
    • Cover pinning board and blocking form with plastic wrap and pin in place. Hint: If you use coloured plastic wrap, it may be easier to see what you're doing.
     
    • Make sure your hands are clean.
     
    • Pour stiffening solution in the plastic bag and put the bag into a bowl so it does not make a mess.
     
    • Totally immerse your item into the solution.
     
    • When it is well coated, remove it from the bag and gently press out the excess solution. Do not wring or squeeze the item. Make sure all solution is removed from any decorative holes in the item. Hint: Leftover solution may be stored in the zipped plastic bag for a couple of days. After that, throw it away.
     
    • Pin the item on the board or form, shaping as necessary. If desired, pin it in place.
     
    • Remove pins from item while it is still slightly damp.
     
    • Use spray bottle of water to moisten item to reshape if necessary.
     
    • Do not bend starched item unless it is still damp.
     
    • If it is too dry, it may crack. Let dry thoroughly before removing it from board or form.